Edition: Vol. 06, No. 3
Edition date: March 20, 2013

 

Important information from the Oregon Building Codes Division to local building departments.

BCD Office Closures

None

 
BCD Events

None at this time

 
Meetings

March 5: Board of Boiler Rules

March 6: Mechanical Board

March 12: 2014 OMSC Committee

March 13: 2014 OSSC Committee

March 27: 2014 OSSC Committee

March 28: Electrical & Elevator Board

April 3: Residential and Manufactured Structures Board

April 4: 2014 OSSC Committee

April 16: Review of the 2014 OEESC

April 17: 2014 OSSC Committee

April 18: State Plumbing Board

April 23: Rulemaking Hearing

April 30: Review of the 2014 OEESC

 
 
 
 
Jurisdiction Questions or Issues

Email: localjurisdictioncontact.bcd
@state.or.us

Contact:
Brett Salmon
503-373-7613

News Updates - March 20, 2013

Structural Program Contacts

As BCD continues to position itself to provide greater customer service, we have made several changes and additions to our Structural Program staff over the past few years. Here is an update on what the program looks like today.

  • Steve Judson, P.E., Facilities Engineer
    Steve has a degree in civil engineering with a strong structural design background. He has run his own engineering firm as well as serving as the building official for Trinity County, CA. Steve serves as a code specialist in the following areas:

    o Structural provisions for both the Oregon Structural Specialty Code (OSSC) and the Oregon Residential Specialty Code (ORSC)
    o OSSC and the ORSC - General Questions
    o Fire, Life-Safety
    o Accessibility
    o Oregon Mechanical Specialty Code (OMSC)

  • Mark Heizer, P.E. LEED AP, Technical Policy Analyst
    Mark has a degree in mechanical engineering and was instrumental in the adoption of both the Oregon Reach Code and the Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code. Mark also chairs ICC's Code Advisory Committee for the International Energy Conservation Code. Mark serves as a code specialist in the following areas:

    o OMSC
    o Oregon Reach Code
    o Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code (OEESC)
    o COMcheck, the commercial energy compliance software
    o Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code (OSISC) - both commercial and residential
    o ORSC

  • Tony Rocco, Building Code Specialist
    Tony comes to the division with a background as a general contractor and has also run a successful home inspection business. Tony is a fully certified ICC inspector and plans examiner and has honed his code application skills while serving as a plans examiner for BCD's jurisdictions over the past 2 years. Tony serves as a code specialist in the following areas:

    o OSSC
    o Structural provisions related to the ORSC
    o Fire, Life-Safety
    o Accessibility
    o ORSC
    o OMSC

  • Mark Campion, Policy Analyst - Green Building Services
    Mark has served the division in a variety of rolls for more than 19 years. Most recently, his analyst skills proved instrumental in the adoptions of the Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code, the Oregon Reach Code and the Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code. Mark serves as a code specialist in the following areas:

    o Oregon Reach Code
    o COMcheck, the commercial energy compliance software
    o OEESC - both commercial and residential
    o OSISC

Check out this great contact sheet for contact information!

Code Committee updates

The Structural Code Committee has started its review and adoption process for the 2014 Oregon Structural Specialty Code (OSSC). The committee’s fourth meeting took place on Wednesday, March 13, 2013. The next meeting will be Wednesday, March 27, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Building Codes Division. If you want to follow along with the process, you can attend as a guest or watch via live video streaming. Documents such as code proposals, chapter-related review, and the code matrix can be viewed on the committee website.

For more information, contact Richard Rogers, chief building official, 503-378-4472 or Steve Judson, P.E., facilities engineer, 503-378-4635.

The Mechanical Code Committee concluded its adoption process review for the 2014 Oregon Mechanical Specialty Code (OMSC) on Tuesday, March 12, 2013. The Mechanical Board is scheduled to review the committee’s recommendations on Wednesday, June 5, 2013. If you want to follow along with the process, you can review the recorded meetings, documents such as code proposals, chapter-related review, and the code matrix on the committee website.

For more information, contact Mark Heizer, mechanical code specialist, 503-373-0205.

The Energy Code Adoption Process
The division accepted code change proposals pertaining to the adoption of the 2014 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code (OEESC) through Feb. 28, 2013. Committee meetings will begin this spring.

For more information, contact Mark Heizer, mechanical code specialist, 503-373-0205.

ODOT parking sign update

In accordance with Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 447.233, the Oregon Transportation Commission (OTC) is tasked with adopting standards for accessible person parking places. All new construction or restriping of accessible parking spaces and access aisles is required to meet new minimum standards as adopted by OTC.

In the spring of 2012, OTC adopted new accessible parking space signage requirements, which are scheduled to take effect April 1, 2013. OTC reports that sign manufacturers were notified at that time of the changes which are necessary to be consistent with the 2010 Federal ADA Update.

Building Code Division (BCD) includes the parking standards as adopted by OTC in the Oregon Structural Specialty Code (OSSC) as a convenience for code users. Consistent with OTC’s actions, BCD worked with the International Code Council in May 2012 to update the online 2010 OSSC and notified our stakeholders of OTC’s actions.

A PDF copy of Chapter 11, inclusive of the OTC revisions, is attached and formatted as insert pages for those using loose leaf editions of the 2010 OSSC.

For more information on the OTC actions, visit its website.

For more information on the OSSC changes, contact Richard Rogers, chief building official, 503-378-4472 or Steve Judson, P.E., facilities engineer, 503-378-4635.

Appendix SR – A move to model code

Special Residence occupancies have been in existence for several code cycles as an appendix to the Oregon Structural Specialty Code (OSSC). The appendix was originally created to fill a void that the model code didn’t address regarding personal care facilities licensed by the state. These facilities span four different levels of residential care and treatment, which can include adults and children in residential structures with between five to 16 residents under 24-hour supervision. The residents may have varying degrees of functional abilities and may or may not be able to evacuate the structure on their own accord. The Appendix SR provisions in the OSSC comprise a full Oregon amendment to the International Building Code (IBC) and require considerable maintenance in properly assessing and coordinating the needs of contemporary health care with the development of new building codes.

To address the gaps in model code for these occupancies, The International Codes Council (ICC) convened a “Code Technologies Committee (CTC) – Care Study Group,” which worked diligently over the past few code cycles to develop a consensus code proposal. As a result of the CTC’s efforts, a sweeping code change was approved on the “consent agenda” at the 2015 IBC Final Action Hearings held in Portland this past October. These revisions will be published in the 2015 International Building Code.

In anticipation of the approval of the CTC proposal, BCD began working with various stakeholders throughout the fall of 2012 to consider the benefits of moving to model code language for special occupancies. The proposal was thoroughly vetted through the Office of the State Fire Marshal, Oregon Health Authority, code officials, the design industry, the health care industry, and other constituents.

As a result of the final action hearings and stakeholder outreach, Oregon’s 2014 OSSC Code Review Committee recently passed a motion to remove Oregon’s existing SR appendix in its entirety and adopt the 2015 IBC provisions with certain necessary Oregon amendments for inclusion in the 2014 OSSC. The proposal will be forwarded to the Building Codes Structures Board in June for their approval and recommendation to the division for final rulemaking. The anticipated effective date of the 2014 OSSC is April 1, 2014.

For more information, contact Facilities Engineer Steve Judson at 503-378-4635.

Update on arc-fault current
interrupter code amendments

The Division held a rulemaking hearing for the permanent AFCI requirements on Tuesday, February 19, 2013. Testimony at the rulemaking hearing included suggestions for further amendments to the proposed rules. The Division will be recommending changes that would allow exempted circuit to supply outlets in multiple rooms. This would decrease the number of dedicated circuits resulting in less wire in the wall than 'home run circuits' serving individual outlets, and reducing the amount of unprotected wiring in the walls for users who intend to install multiple non-AFCI circuits. The Division will recommend the changes to the Electrical and Elevator Board at its March 28, 2013 meeting and to the Residential and Manufactured Structures Board at its April 3, 2013, meeting. If approved, the revisions would be adopted effective June 30, 2013.

Background
The 2011 National Electric Code (NEC) expanded arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection beyond dwelling unit bedrooms into dens, living rooms, and other similar areas. When the 2011 Oregon Electrical Specialty Code (OESC) Committee initially reviewed AFCI code proposals, the members heard testimony that AFCI’s were prone to unwanted tripping when older appliances or certain combinations of appliances mimicked the electrical current waveform AFCIs associate with arc faults. The Code Committee recommended a delayed effective date of July 1, 2012, for the expanded requirements.

In April 2012, the OESC Committee met to consider delaying the scheduled July 2012 expansion of AFCIs to other areas in a dwelling unit. The Committee heard testimony from contractors, AFCI manufacturers, and representatives from the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). As a result, the committee recommended to the Electrical and Elevator Board a further delay in expanding AFCIs in dwelling units.

In May, the Board approved the Committee’s recommendation. BCD filed temporary rules on June 7, 2012, delaying the scheduled July 1, 2012, expansion of AFCIs until the division had time to gather more information. BCD held a public meeting on August 8, 2012, to hear input from stakeholder groups and other interested people concerning AFCI use in dwelling units. Comments from stakeholders were mixed – some supported the expanded use of AFCIs while others requested a delay until AFCI technology improves. At its November 15, 2012, meeting, the Electrical and Elevator Board approved a proposed rule that expanded use of AFCIs outside bedrooms but allowed for non-AFCI protected dedicated circuits to be used in some circumstances. The temporary requirements became effective January 1, 2013, and expire June 30, 2013. On January 9, 2013, BCD presented the proposed AFCI rule to the Residential and Manufactured Structures Board and received additional feedback.

For more information, contact Judith Ingram Moore, electrical program policy analyst, 503-378-2775, or Dennis Clements, chief electrical inspector, 503-378-4459.

Oregon's EV charging infrastructure is growing

Oregon recently completed its portion of the West Coast Electric Highway, a multi-state project to install 'quick chargers' at regular intervals along the entire length of Interstate 5 from British Columbia to Baja. Quick chargers or "DC fast chargers," can fully charge an electric vehicle's (EV) depleted battery pack in as little as 20 to 30 minutes.

Electric vehicles (EV) charging stations, technically referred to as Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE), are electrical installations regulated by the building code. BCD ensures that the stations are safely installed. Safety is especially important when it comes to quick chargers intended for public use.

If you're interested in finding out more about Oregon's growing EV charging infrastructure check out the latest post on the Better Buildings for Oregon blog.

latest post on BCD's Better Buildings for Oregon blog.

Enforcement

Summary of enforcement cases presented
to the State Plumbing Board

Summary report: These cases were resolved by the division's enforcement section without going to a contested case hearing. No action was required by the State Plumbing Board.

Plumbing Conditioned Licenses

Summary of enforcement cases presented
to the Board of Boiler Rules

Summary report: These cases were resolved by the division's enforcement section without going to a contested case hearing. No action was required by the Board of Boiler Rules.


Published by the State of Oregon Building Codes Division.
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